Montreal Skaters Light Up The Olympic Stadium’s New Bowl

“Once the competition ends, the Vans Skatepark will be free for skaters of all levels — and that’s a good thing for Montreal, says local pro Annie Guglia who is busy training for Tokyo.”

“It’s crazy to think that this is in Montreal, right next to the Olympic Stadium,” she said. “This is the best terrain park we have in Canada.” Read the rest of the article here.

How Does A Vans Bowl Contest Get Built In Montreal

“This year, Vans Park Series is officially leaving Vancouver and heading to the East Coast, making Montreal home to their Canadian headquarters, and VPS stop. So we took the opportunity to look at the behind the scenes of what it takes to organize an event like VPS and talk to the unsung heroes that make it all happen. ” Read the rest of the article here.

Skateboarding Defies The Neoliberal Logic Of The City By Making It A Playground For All

Skateboarding today is a global phenomenon, with around 50m riders and thousands of skate parks worldwide – it will even feature as a sport in the 2020 Olympic Games. From the full on testosterone of Thrasher skateboard magazine to the fashionable styling of Vogue, the skater girls and boys of Kabul to the Native American reservations of South Dakota, the skate parks of Brazil to the streets of Shenzhen, skateboarding is no longer just for punkish, subcultural rebels – it’s everywhere, for everyone. Read the rest of the article here.

Vancouver’s First Skatepark Celebrates 40 Years Of Carving And Community

The year was 1979 and a small patch of park near Clark Drive and Broadway had a similarly life-changing effect on generations of Vancouverites past and present. The China Creek skatepark turns 40 this year, and members of Vancouver’s skating community will gather July 19 for a birthday bash at the Smiling Buddha Cabaret (SBC).” Read the rest of the article here.

It’s Okay To Fall

Standing at the top of a skateboarding ramp, preparing to roll down the side for the first time, is intimidating enough. But it can be even more so when you’re the only girl at the skate park.” Read the rest of the article here.

Skateboard artist Mark Carroll

“I was a latch key kid with alcoholic parents,” Carroll said. “I spent a lot of time at my grandmother’s house in Halifax and there were a lot of poor kids around who didn’t have a lot. When my uncle brought out that skateboard I just grabbed it and went down the hill. Looking back, something just went, ‘this is me’.” Read the rest of the article here.

How Skaters Make Cities Safer

Southbank
Philadelphia’s homeless population, who came to congregate at Love. Property values dropped and, for a while, the city bemoaned the park as derelict and dangerous. But once skateboarders started arriving on the scene in the early 90s, things started to change.” According to Howell: “Skateboarders made it seem safe again. As [Philadelphia skate legend] Ricky Oyola put it, ‘If these little kids aren’t scared, why should I be scared; I’m a 30-year-old man coming home from work.’ Once it’s safe for young skaters, it’s safe for young male office workers. Once it’s safe for male office workers, it becomes safer for female office workers, then for older folks, and so on.” Read the rest of the article here.